Heartworm

Triennial American Heartworm Society Report Released

Triennial American Heartworm Society Report Released

The American Heartworm Society has just released its 2016 Heartworm Incidence Survey results, calling it The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. The triennial survey gathers information from over 4200 veterinarians across the country, from clinics and shelters. The Good • Veterinarians who reported reductions in cases credit better compliance with monthly heartworm preventive administration. […]

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Feline Heartworm Disease Myths Busted

Feline Heartworm Disease Myths Busted

At the Central Veterinary Conference in Washington, D.C., in May, 2013, Kristin MacDonald, D.V.M., PhD, DACVIM (cardiology), co-author of Feline Cardiology (Wiley-Blackwell), addressed 11 fallacies practitioners encounter in an effort to ensure more cats are protected with heartworm preventives year-round.  DVMNewsmagazine has made her presentation available to MyPetsDoctor.com readers and subscribers. Myth #1: Cats are resistant to […]

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Slow-Kill And Fast-Kill Heartworm Treatment

Slow-Kill And Fast-Kill Heartworm Treatment

A bold divide exists among veterinarians on the topic of how to rid dogs’ bodies of heartworms. Few lack passion for this subject. “Slow kill” or “fast kill?” Traditional “fast kill” heartworm treatment which, by the way, is not particularly fast, involves the use of Immiticide. (And, the newer medication, Diroban.) Two regimens are described […]

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Activity Restriction Needed During Heartworm Treatment

Activity Restriction Needed During Heartworm Treatment

Activity restriction is important for dogs undergoing heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) treatment. However, it is not usually needed for the entire process, just during the time after Immiticide (and, the newer medication, Diroban) injections are administered. Patients undergoing “slow kill” heartworm treatment need activity restriction only if there are complications or preexisting heart disease. Follow the advice […]

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Heartworm Disease IS A Big Deal!

Heartworm Disease IS A Big Deal!

“My previous veterinarian didn’t act like heartworms were any big deal, that’s why Sharkie wasn’t on a heartworm preventive. Now, thanks to you, I know better!” Sadly, we veterinarians must not be doing the quality and quantity of client education we should be on heartworm disease, because, nationwide, only 46-55% of dogs (depending on the […]

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Rarity Of Microfilarial Reactions In Cats

Rarity Of Microfilarial Reactions In Cats

Mrs. Jones, in the clinic for her cat Wilson’s semiannual examination, asked, “Dr. Randolph, when our dog Phred missed a dose of heartworm preventive last year, he had to have a heartworm test before he could take his preventive again. However, Wilson has been on heartworm preventive for all of his five years of life, […]

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February Heartworm Preventive Schedule

February Heartworm Preventive Schedule

Repeatedly we have made the point that heartworm preventives are monthly medications. They are not every 33 days medications. They are not every 34 days medications. They are not every six weeks medications! Periodically, then, they question comes up, “Should I adjust my heartworm preventive administration for February?” No. If you normally give your heartworm […]

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Veterinarians As Educators

Veterinarians As Educators

There is no more important role of your veterinarian than that of educator.   Yes, we can fix things, and yes, when there is an emergency we have to remember our ABCs: Airway, Breathing, Cardiopulmonary. After the dust settles and the feathers are no longer flying, it is crucial that we sit down with clients […]

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Questions About Heartworm Complications

Questions About Heartworm Complications

Reader “SJaffe” writes to us, “Hi, Dr. Randolph, I foster a Cocker spaniel who is 12 years old. She is heartworm-positive and it’s just breaking my heart. I would love to do everything I possibly can do help her get through this. She doesn’t really have a cough but she breathes very, very deeply (with […]

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