Male Dog Penis And Sheath Discharge

The phone call started in an ordinary way, “Dr. Randolph, I need to make an appointment for Gus.”

A quick glance at Gus’ file in our computer system showed he wasn’t due for a routine visit, so I inquired of his owner about possible problems as a reason for the visit.

“He has a yellow-green discharge from his penis.”

A yellowish to greenish small-volume discharge from a male dog's sheath is normal.

I closed the appointment book, and pressed F1 on the keyboard, sending the computer software back to the Main Menu.

“No appointment needed,” I explained to Gus’ master. All male dogs have a yellow-green discharge. It’s actually coming from the sheath, not the penis. Quantity can vary from undetectable to a drop, but it’s all normal.”

The material, which looks much like pus to the naked eye, is actually made of cells and lubricant fluid that surrounds the penis inside its protective sheath. It has a pungent, acrid smell and will sometimes be noticed where a male dog has lain.

Discharges from the sheath with other characteristics, such as blood, or a large volume of material that resembles pus, would be a cause for concern.

As for me, I’ll just have to wait for a big, sloppy Gus-kiss until another day.

See you tomorrow, Dr. Randolph.

4 Comments to “Male Dog Penis And Sheath Discharge”

  1. Ashlaii 24 February 2014 at 5:24 pm #

    My female kitten has the same problem and it’s been going on for a couple of days, should I be worried? I’m trying to take her to the veterinarian sometime this week.

    • Dr. James W. Randolph 26 February 2014 at 5:47 pm #

      Your kitty should see her veterinarian as soon as you are able.

      • Ashlaii 28 February 2014 at 1:55 am #

        I took her to the ER last night after I couldn’t get an appointment until the weekend, the veterinarian said she’s pregnant (which I’m extremely happy about) and the discharge is normal. I continue to worry. She continues to have this discharge and she is grunting a lot, is this normal? What does the grunting mean? It sounds to me as if she’s complaining about something. Is she in pain? Please help!

        • Dr. James W. Randolph 2 March 2014 at 3:16 pm #

          Ashlaii, I would be delighted to help, if I could. However, I can’t be there to examine your pet or to hear her grunts or to determine whether she is expressing pain. All I can do is to encourage you to continue to consult your local veterinarian, who has examined your pet and, thus, has some insight. If the grunting is a new problem, not present at the time of the first examination, he may need to see her again to evaluate it.


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