Ophthalmology

Dog And Cat Lens Luxation

Anterior and posterior lens luxation are conditions that can range from non-event to major surgery. DEFINITION OF TERMS What is it? Let’s break it down. Anterior means front or forward, from the Latin root meaning before, and in this case refers to the frontmost chamber of the eye. It’s no surprise that it’s called the […]

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Dog And Cat Proptosed Globes

Proptosed globe may be the second scariest condition of pets after seizures. Prominent-eyed dogs such as Pugs and Pekinese are prone to this condition, in which the eyeball itself pops out of the eye socket, usually as a result of trauma. Proptosis is a Greek word meaning “fall forward.” Globe is a term ophthalmologists and […]

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Coping With Cats’ Blindness

In a story about pet lovers coping with blind dogs we had good news that most dogs and their people perform better than satisfactorily. The story on blind cats is equally encouraging. Today we have interviewed Renee, who lost her kitty Buggy recently. Buggy first lost her vision on a weekend in a surprise episode. […]

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Coping With Dogs’ Blindness

Your dog (or cat) is going blind. You have no experience with a blind pet. You don’t know what to expect. You don’t know how to cope. Fortunately, your pet does. Our only remaining dog, Pearl, is experiencing a degenerative retinal condition that is causing a gradual deterioration of her vision. Fortunately it is so […]

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Dog and Cat Corneal Ulcers

Corneal ulcers in dogs and cats are known to be very painful. We veterinarians can tell by the way pets squint when they have them. Some dogs’ eyelids can be nearly impossible to open because of the pain. In addition, we know from people that corneal ulcers are reported to be the second-most-painful physical abnormality […]

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