Don’t Give A New Pet’s Parasites To Your Existing Pets

Hookworms.

Perhaps the most common intestinal parasite of dogs and cats.

Roundworms are also common, but tend to occur in younger animals. After a dog or cat reaches a year of age they are still susceptible to both parasites, but much more likely to become infected with hookworms.

Joni could have transmitted hookworms to her new housemates had we not caught the infestation so quickly.

Joni could have transmitted hookworms to her new housemates had we not caught the infestation so quickly.

Joni is the reason this topic comes up today.

Precious and beautiful she came up to a client’s home as a stray this morning. They already had two golden retrievers, but one has bone cancer, osteosarcoma, and probably won’t have a lot longer to live.

Like me, these pet lovers like to have two dogs at a time, especially for the companionship they give each other. While they weren’t exactly looking for another pet yet, they do feel Joni is a gift from the Lord.

So, what does that have to do with hookworms? Simple. Joni has them. And, in the excitement of Joni’s arrival these pet owners did what any of us might do: let them play with the other two dogs.

Because Joni had not been at the house long, not even long enough to have a bowel movement, it’s unlikely that worm transmission has occurred. We will, however, be testing Sara and Catherine in about a month to be sure they stay hookworm-free.

Let Joni be a reminder to all pet owners: Until that new pet goes to see your veterinarian, be sure to keep them separated.

See you tomorrow, Dr. Randolph.

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