Pet Care In A Pet Owner Emergency

Continuing the theme from yesterday of caring for pets in one’s absence, let’s discuss a less drastic situation, one in which a pet owner is simply disabled.

This scenario is reminiscent of my wife, Brenda’s injuries back in July, 2009. Her fall took place at 10 PM, and, while I live in the world of medical emergencies every day, this one was a little different from what I’m used to dealing with!

So, not only did I have to formulate a plan for getting to the hospital to be with Brenda during her examination and evaluation, I had an elderly dog and an elderly cat to plan for, too.

Fortunately for me, which wouldn’t apply to most of our readers, I have built-in, 24 hour access to boarding, so it was easy to take Pearl to our hospital, set her up for the night, then leave instructions for the staff to care for her the next day.

Martha presents a little more challenge, as we have previously described her as “grouchy,” she is an unwelcome visitor at the clinic. So, I cleaned her litterbox well, filled several water bowls, grabbed Pearl and her necessities and headed for the clinic.

As Pearl is a regular boarder at our hospital, I have her needs and a list of her travel supplies in my head.

You would do well to make a written list to be used in emergencies, when you might not be thinking clearly, or when you are unconscious and on your way to the hospital and someone else has to make arrangements for your pet. If you regularly board your pet at a certain location, have that in the instructions for helpers to know where to take him. List his medications, and keep that list updated when dosages or schedules change.

If you “ICE” your phone be sure the contact person(s) knows your pet’s needs by listing someone to whom you have sent instructions for pet care.

Planning ahead can make an emergency much more bearable, with fewer sequella for you and your pets.

See you Christmas Eve, Dr. Randolph.

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